Moccasins

Moccasins

Pair of moccasins

High back style with beaded blue and yellow flowers and beaver fur trim.

Before non-Native contact, the Southern Tutchone wore moccasin-trousers, a lower garment incorporating both pant and shoe. Once European traders secured their trade routes in the Yukon, First Nations quickly converted to wearing European style clothing yet continued to wear native made footwear.

Generally, moccasins and mukluks are known to be warmer and more comfortable then Western style shoes. They are well-suited to the north, and a pair of work moccasins could be made in a day. With ordinary wear they should last about two months. However, active people would have had several pairs incase the moccasins got wet or ripped while in the bush. Gift or dress moccasins are usually the slipper type and due to the decoration generally take longer to make than simple work moccasins. Women spend several hours, even days, beading or making fancy silk embroidery designs. These moccasins are a high top model with a fur trim and floral beading.

Institution

Kluane Museum of History, Burwash Landing

Accession Number

1974.32.a-b

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